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Arctic Sea Ice “More Resilient” Than Thought

15.12.2014
15.12.2014 07:23 Age: 3 yrs

Arctic sea ice is holding up to global warming better than expected, according to the latest data from the CryoSat-2 satellite, a team from University College London will tell the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco today.

Click to enlarge. Sea ice thickness October-November 2010. Courtesy ESA.

Click to enlarge. Sea ice thickness October-November 2011. Courtesy ESA.

Click to enlarge. Sea ice thickness October-November 2012 showing major decline. Courtesy ESA.

Click to enlarge. Sea ice thickness October-November 2013 showing sharp recovery. Courtesy ESA.

Click to enlarge. Sea ice thickness October-November 2014 broadly maintaining the recovery seen in 2013 and in line with the five year average. Courtesy ESA.

Click to enlarge. CryoSat-2, artist's impression. Courtesy ESA.

Click to enlarge. Arctic sea ice thickness from CryoSat data acquired between 9 November and 8 December 2014. Bright white shows the sea ice extent at the start of the period, while light grey is the extent at the end. Coloured dots show ice thickness up to 3.5 m (pink). Scientists are working to deliver operational capabilities from the CryoSat mission, so that the measurements can be used for routine assessments in climate science and for services affected by Arctic sea ice, such as shipping. Courtesy ESA.

 

Arctic sea ice volumes in the autumn of 2014 are above the average set over the last five years and sharply up on the lows seen in 2011 and 2012, according to the latest satellite data.

Data from the European Space Agency (ESA) CryoSat-2 satellite to be presented to the American Geophysical Union's Fall Meeting in San Francisco later today (Monday 15 December, 2014) will show Arctic sea ice volumes in October and November 2014 averaging 10,200km33Here is a news release from the European Space Agency regarding this research issued on 15 December 2014:

CryoSat Extends Its reach Into The Arctic

End of ESA news release.

Abstract


Citation

CryoSat-2 observes Arctic sea ice volume recovery, after anomalously low melting in summer 2013 by Rachel Tilling, Andy Ridout, Andrew Shepherd and Duncan Wingham presented to the American Geophysical Union's Fall Meeting in San francisco on 15 December 2014.

Read the abstract here.

Source

ESA news release here.

See also

Our story on CryoSat 2013 data herehere.